Photographer’s Gallery, London February 2014

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I went to London for a few days to visit my good friend Gary who works and lives in London- while I was there I had the chance to explore the city and visit some exhibitions.

ImageTate Modern.

The first gallery I stumbled upon was the Photographer’s Gallery 16-18 Ramillies Street, London City.  There was a few exhibitions on that week including David Lynch: The Factory Photographs. 

Anyone familiar with David Lynch’s (b. 1946, USA) enigmatic visual language will identify similarities between this series of photographs and his iconic films. Featuring black and white interiors and exteriors of industrial structures, the exhibition exudes his unique cinematic style through dark and brooding images.

Shot in various locations including Germany, Poland, New York, New Jersey and England, the works depict the labyrinthine passages, detritus and decay of these man-made structures – haunting cathedrals of a bygone industrial era slowly being taken over by nature.
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Another exhibition that was held in the Photographer’s Gallery was Taking Shots:  The Photography of William S. Borroughs- both exhibitions are on until 30th March 2014.
A popular icon of the beat generation and one of my favourite writers with novels such as Naked Lunch (1959), it was a great experiance and pleasure to see his personal photographic work.
William S.Burroughs (1914-1997) USA, a writer and artist , he was also an inveterate photographer, making extensive use of photographs and photographic techniques throughout his life. He thought of photographs as ‘catching the intersection points between your inner reality and what you are seeing’ .
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Some other exhibitions included Andy Warhol: Photographs 1976-1987
I told them I didn’t believe in art, that I believed in photography.
Andy Warhol 

Despite his fame as a painter, filmmaker and colourist, Andy Warhol’s (1928 – 1987) use of photographic imagery permeates his practice. However, it was only later in his life, when acquainted with the compact cameras of the 1970s that he focused on photography in its own right.

Using 35mm black and white film, Warhol carried a camera with him most of the time – taking up to 36 frames a day. Capturing everyday details, people, street scenes, celebrity parties, interiors, cityscapes and signage his subjects all reflect the artist’s characteristic indifference to hierarchy.

Warhol’s interest in serial and repeated imagery, seen throughout his work, is brought to play through his striking series of ‘stitched’ photographs, creating over 500 between 1982 and his death in 1987. These feature identical images arranged in grid form, stitched together with a sewing machine.

Tendencies and patterns emerge across both the singular and stitched works that reveal photography to be at the centre of Warhol’s thinking, looking and making.”

http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/andy-warhol-2

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

Exhibition Space

Exhibition Space

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