London March 2014

I’m visiting London in a few weeks and totally excited to visit some of the exhibitions on going there right now.

I’m looking forward to seeing Richard Hamilton exhibition at Tate Modern.

One of the most influential British artists of the 20th century, Richard Hamilton (1922–2011) is widely regarded as a founding figure of pop art, who continued to experiment and innovate over a career of 60 years. Tate Modern presents the first retrospective to encompass the full scope of Hamilton’s work, from his early exhibition designs of the 1950s to his final paintings of 2011. This exhibition explores his relationship to design, painting, photography and television, as well as his engagement and collaborations with other artists.

Hamilton is best known for his pivotal role in the birth of pop art, including the groundbreaking installation Fun House 1956. A centrepiece of the exhibition, this immersive room combines images from movie-posters, magazines and art history, and will be shown alongside a print of the era-defining Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing?. The depiction of Mick Jagger in the iconic series Swingeing London 67 1968–9, as well as images of other celebrities such as Bing Crosby and Marilyn Monroe, will show Hamilton’s continued interest in popular culture. Wider contemporary issues and political subjects are also addressed in his work, including the Kent State shootings and the IRA ‘dirty protests’, as well as figures like Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair in such works as Treatment Room 1984 and Shock and Awe 2010. Hamilton’s interest in interiors, architecture and design is represented by his depictions of everything from the Guggenheim Museum in New York to a classic Braun toaster.

Interior II 1964 by Richard Hamilton 1922-2011

Interior 1964-5 by Richard Hamilton 1922-2011

 

Richard Hamilton is curated by Mark Godfrey, Curator of International Art, Tate Modern, Paul Schimmel and Vicente Todolí with Hannah Dewar, Assistant Curator, Tate Modern.

Exhibition organised by the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in collaboration with Tate Modern.

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/talks-and-lectures/richard-hamilton-politics-and-art-1980s

Exhibitions to check out : London February exhibitions to see:

http://drawingroom.org.uk/exhibitions/abstract-drawing / The Drawing Room London

Introduction from Exhibition article:

“One of the things that has interested me in making this selection – aside from the intrinsic delight at looking at so many drawings – has to do with ideas about what or where is the real.” Richard Deacon

Artist Richard Deacon has selected a broad range of works by over 30 artists spanning the last 105 years on the idea of ‘abstraction’ in drawing.

Deacon says: ‘This exhibition has no ambitions to be a universal survey, but in selecting a show around the idea of abstract drawing, these various strands – inscriptive, calligraphic, ornamental, generative, individuating and identifying – have all featured.’

Richard Deacon CBE is one of the most important British sculptors of his generation and has exhibited internationally since the early 1980s. He won the Turner prize in 1987, and a major retrospective exhibition of his work will be presented at Tate Britain in 2014 (5 February – 27 April). The activity of drawing is crucial to his work as a sculptor, which engages with processes and means of manufacture. This deep interest in making as an activity is evident in his selection of works for Abstract Drawing.

The earliest works exhibited here are drawings made in 1906 by Swedish artist Hilma af Klint, recently heralded as producing the earliest forms of Western abstraction, and in 1917/18 byKazimir Malevich,  regarded as the father of abstraction. There is a rare blot drawing by Jackson Pollock (1951) that exploits the quality of working with fluid mediums on porous paper. Works made in the 1960s include those by Eva Hesse, Mira Schendel, Dom Sylvester Houedard (well known for his concrete poetry), and Frederick Hammersley (an American artist who pioneered computer drawings).

Two works on paper by Sol LeWitt, a One-second drawing by John Latham,  works by Indian modernist Nasreen Mohamedi, and Romanian artist Victor Caito were all made in the 1970s. Works made in the 1980s include rarely seen drawings in relief by Anish Kapoor and works by artist and historian John Golding whose Paths to the Absolute (2000) is a key text on abstract art.

Watercolours on paper by David Austen represent the 1990s and works from the 2000’s include senior Iranian artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, Turner prize winner Tomma Abts and nominee Alison Wilding (the latter the subject of a major Duveen galleries display at the newly renovated Tate Britain, London), London-based artists David Batchelor,  Emma McNally and Sam Messenger and International artist Susan Hefuna, who has German-Egyptian heritage.  Another highlight is a newly commissioned wall drawing by US-based artist Victoria Haven.

Abstract Drawing is Drawing Room’s fourth artist-curated exhibition, a strand of the programme that aims to provide insight into the ideas that inform the work of key contemporary artists.”

Adonis in Y-fronts by Richard Hamilton, 1963

Adonis in Y-fronts by Richard Hamilton, 1963

Three Key Facts About Richard Hamilton

In Pictures is a still and moving image gallery for significant works, events and places
— February 13, 2014 —

 

http://www.anothermag.com/current/view/3358/Three_Key_Facts_About_Richard_Hamilton

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